Calder Yates

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Calder Yates (b. 1985) lives and works in Los Angeles, CA and Jacksonville, FL. He received his BA from New College of Florida (Sarasota) in Art and Political Science and a dual degree—MFA in Studio Art and MA in Visual & Critical Studies—from CCA. In Jacksonville, Yates has worked as a Museum Educator for the Cummer Museum of Art and Gardens and owned and operated Flat File Gallery. He’s taught art classes in Jacksonville’s arts magnet high school as well as with Florida State College of Jacksonville. He has worked for the New York City Office of Emergency Management and collaborated and danced with Club Lyfestile, a neon unitard–wearing dance group based in Philadelphia. He has taught art therapy programming in hospital oncology units in Jacksonville and Oakland, CA. Most recently, through The Center for Art and Public Life’s IMPACT Grant, Yates and a team of three others traveled to Turkey to create and implement a tutoring and mentorship program for the children of Syrian refugees in Izmir, Turkey. His artwork has been exhibited at Southern Exposure, Wattis Institute of Contemporary Art, and The Hammer Museum. Currently, Yates is a freelance writer and video editor, as well as a curatorial consultant for the Mayo Clinic.

http://calderyates.com/

Calder Yates, Two Teams of 5 Members Each, While Blindfolded, Work To Build An Arch With Whatever Materials Are On Hand In About 8 Minutes, 2012

Calder Yates, Two Teams of 5 Members Each, While Blindfolded, Work To Build An Arch With Whatever Materials Are On Hand In About 8 Minutes, 2012

 

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About Calder Yates's Thesis Project

Calder Yates

CONTRADICTORY COMPASSION: TIME AND DOCILITY IN EARLY FIRST AID DEMONSTRATIONS

What does it look like when one person cares for another? In the vast majority of instances, first aid demonstrations—a series of life-saving drills, which have doctrinal underpinning, and which require training—are imperative and beneficial. But they are also profoundly political, subsumed within a normative discursive practice. Industrial capitalism’s promotion of first aid between 1900 and 1920 coincided with new understandings of medicine, and new ethics regarding injured individuals, and the history of all this is also the history of the nature of care. It is also possible to argue that first aid created disincentives to health, and even suggested that the long-term survival of the individual is, in fact, dispensable. Presently, first aid’s ubiquitous demonstrations sterilely ignore pain, and diminish the idea of the human subject as capable of deep feeling, compassion, and anguish.

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