Eden Redmond

eden

Eden Redmond is a multimedia artist and critical writer from Sacramento, California. She is currently a candidate for her MA in Visual Critical Studies at California College of the Arts. She graduated from Southern Oregon University with her BFA in printmaking and painting and drawing.

Eden’s professional work spans across the LGBTQ, fine art, and social justice communities. In each realm she strives for reciprocal listening, equity, accessibility, interchange and humor. Her work ranges from large-scale paintings, and group gallery shows to dialogue based work and participatory print installations.

Eden is interested in all things kitschy, campy and surprisingly poignant. Themes in her current work include Internet based artists and collectives, disidentification, girl culture, white women rappers, queerness, intersectionality, and the ‘kooky-wacky’.

Eden is terrible at making cake pops.

Links:
edenredmond.squarespace.com
piggyinthesink.tumblr.com

Contact Info:
eden.m.redmond@gmail.com

Recent Happenings:

About Eden Redmond’s Thesis Project

Eden Redmond

Keeping in Touch

Teen Girl Tumblr artists reimagine the still life to indulge and critique the promises of capitalism in the post 2008 Recession economy. Young artists today begin their careers at the intersection between the flailing MFA degree and the post 2008 recession economy. Economic instability and the proliferation of the net has influenced a migration of young artists online. Teen girl Tumblr artists photograph saccharine still life images as subversive and flashy visual imagery to circulate online. The still life genre celebrates colonial acquisition and unfettered material gain, making it a rich platform to engage contemporary capitalist and material concerns. Teen girl Tumblr photographer Hobbes Ginsberg elevates cheap trifles as celebratory and critical engagements. This artwork contributes to the unending accumulation of online imagery. Using Jane Bennett’s new materialism and ideas of the digital landfill, this project mobilizes a critical methodology of trash, positing these objects as vibrant refuse. The rapid accumulation of online images pressurizes definitions of digital photography, cultural studies, and contemporary art.

Watch Symposium Presentation

 

Read Sightlines Article

Sightlines 2016