Erica Gomez

Image Credit: MJ Verdugo, Erica in the series Family Portraits, 2013

Image Credit: MJ Verdugo, Erica in the series Family Portraits, 2013

Born and raised in Denver, Erica C. Gomez (egomez2@cca.edu) received her BA in Art History, Theory and Criticism from Metropolitan State University of Denver, and completed her MA in Visual and Critical Studies from California College of the Arts. With a particular fondness for photography and film, her research is grounded in Chicana Feminism and phenomenology, and investigates themes of lesbian desire, visibility, representation, and spectatorship in visual and popular culture. Her previous written work has explored the roles of lesbian desire and spectatorship in the artworks of Deborah Bright and Tina Fiveash, as well as the FOX television series Glee (2009–present).

She has presented her research as a part of Queer Cultural Center’s Emerging Scholars Program at Galeria de la Raza in San Francisco, and her writing has been published in Art Practical and in Eleven Eleven. She has held curatorial internships at SOMArts Cultural Center and the Mexican Museum in San Francisco, and also co-curated an exhibition and film screening with SFiCA: Breakout at Some Thing Spacious in Oakland, CA in March 2014. Erica is the Shotgun Review Associate Editor for Art Practical, and currently works at Cal Academy of Sciences.

 

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About Erica Gomez's Thesis Project

Erica Gomez

Expressions of Desire: Chicana and Latina Lesbians in Contemporary Cinema and Television

Gestures of desire are an agent of change that move beyond issues of lesbian visibility and representation. As this thesis aims to demonstrate, desire cuts across difference to bridge the spectator and characters in contemporary independent films Mosquita y Mari (2012), Slip Away (2011), and The Good Kind (2014). I argue that desire is an embodied and affective language that can be used to reclaim ancestral archives, communicate lesbian desire through dance, and recreate cultural connections through music and dialogue. Furthermore, I examine cinematic film, and television shows The L Word and Glee to provide an analysis that offers various Chicana and Latina lesbian identities and cultural experiences. Operating from an interdisciplinary methodology, I combine the theoretical frameworks and research methods of postcolonial Chicana feminism—drawing specifically from Gloria Anzaldúa’s borderlands theory, phenomenology, and film theory to investigate the many ways in which Chicana and Latina lesbian embodiment can be expressed and communicated.

Watch Symposium Presentation

 

Read Sightlines Article

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