Liesa Lietzke

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Liesa Lietzke is a San Francisco Bay Area based artist and curator. Her studio work has been exhibited at Deitch Projects Art Parade, Art Basel Miami, The Oakland Museum of California, The Lab, Krowswork and other venues. Her 2013 curatorial project brought together artists addressing an array of issues raised by breast cancer and installed their work at the triennial California Breast Cancer Research Project Symposium. Her writing has been published by the Chinese Cultural Center of San Francisco, San Francisco State University Humanities Symposium Journal, and the arts review website SquareCylinder.com. Lietzke completed her graduate studies at California College of the Arts, earning an MFA in sculpture at in 2009 and an MA in Visual and Critical Studies in 2011.

 

liesalietzke@gmail.com

 

Additional Links:

2011 Performance (video)
Performance salon
Studio website

Recent Happenings:



About Liesa Lietzke’s Thesis Project

Liesa Lietzke

Felt/Seen, I/it: Probing the Body-World Divide through Rebecca Horn’s Extensions

Between 1968 and 1974, the German artist Rebecca Horn produced a series of sculptures to be worn by a performer. They are not props, nor are they costumes intended primarily to create visual effects. Instead, they intervene in the corporeal perceptions of the performer, distorting his or her sense of bodily proportions and motions, and they use presentation methods that invite viewers into this experience. I refer to these works as Extensions. Because they occupy a place between felt-as-body and seen-as-object, they point to this same ambiguity for the body itself, and raise compelling questions about the body-environment boundary in terms of how it is produced in human perception. This thesis investigates how the flexibility of the spatial experience of the body, highlighted by Horn’s Extensions, is closer to the material condition of the flesh and its environment than the usual, common-sense, ending-at-the-skin perception.

Watch Symposium Presentation

Read Sightlines Article

SIghtlines2011